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The Best Barossa Valley Wineries & Cellar Doors

Your guide to Barossa Valley’s historic cellar doors and tasting experiences!

Only a short drive from Adelaide will get you to one of Australia’s most historic wine regions, the Barossa Valley. The international success of Australian wine has a lot to thank the Barossa for, recognised for the outstanding quality of wine to come out of the region since the first plantings over 160 years ago. Today, there are so many internationally renowned wineries in the Barossa with equally acclaimed cellar doors and restaurants that a visit to the area will definitely reward any person with a love of regional wines, produce, and beauty. Fine, fresh and regional flavours abound; a bold Shiraz, a hearty Cabernet Sauv, classic Chardonnays, fresh Rieslings, and everything else in between are all ready for your enjoyment. So, jump in the car, take in the views, soak up the sunshine and savour everything the Barossa has to offer.

The Willows Vineyard

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Situated at Light Pass in the Barossa Valley, The Willows Vineyard has roots going back to the beginning of this historic grape growing region – Johann Gottfried Scholz, an early European colonists and previous Prussian Army bonesetter, first settled The Willows Vineyard property in 1845. But it wasn’t until 1936 that fourth generation relatives of Johann planted the property’s first Semillon vines, with Shiraz, Riesling, Cabernet Sauvignon and Grenache added over the years. Now home to the ‘Bonesetter’ Shiraz and ‘The Doctor’ Sparkling Shiraz in honour of Johann, the Scholz family are proudly 100% Barossan, sourcing fruit entirely from their Light Pass vineyard.

310 Light Pass Rd, Light Pass

Open Wednesday to Monday 10:30am-4:30pm | Closed Tuesday and Public holidays

Visit The Willows Vineyard website

Schild Estate

Barossa Cellar Door Elderton Wines

 

Recognised as a Five Star Winery and listed as one of the ‘Ten Dark Horses’ in the 2019 James Halliday Wine Companion, Schild Estate produces highly acclaimed wines including the Moorooroo Shiraz, of which the 2015 vintage was awarded 99 points (James Halliday, 2019 Wine Companion) and the Ben Schild Reserve Shiraz which was awarded ‘Best in Show – Australian Reds’ at Mundus Vini Grand International Wine Awards 2019. In addition to classic wine tasting experiences, Schild Estate also offers a wine and chocolate pairing experience for $20 per person where guests will be treated to artisan chocolates expertly matched with wines from their collection. Pre-bookings are essential for this unique experience.

Lot 1095, Barossa Valley Way, Lyndoch

Open Friday to Sunday 10am-4pm or by appointment |Closed public holidays.

Visit the Schild Estate website

Château Tanunda

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The majestic bluestone winery and expansive vineyard of Château Tanunda epitomises the Barossa’s colourful history and pioneering spirit. Established in 1890, the grand, meticulously restored buildings and carefully manicured gardens of Château Tanunda are home to the Barossa's earliest vines with the winery now proudly producing wines with fruit from 150-year-old vines. For visitors to this historic property, booking the ‘Discover the Château’ tour is a must, plus there are a host of wines to taste in the Grand Barrel Room, including Old Vine Expression, Terroirs of the Barossa and more. Or, simply enjoy a game of croquet on the lawn and take in the sunshine.

9 Basedow Rd, Tanunda

Open daily 10am-5pm

Visit the Château Tanunda website

Bethany Wines

Eden Valley Winery and Cellar Door Henschke

Bethany Wines’ first vineyard was planted in 1852 with a wine cellar built on the site. Despite the winery’s pioneer, Johann Schrapel, having a good reputation as an early colonial winemaker, the Schrapel family made the decision to focus on viticulture instead of winemaking for the next four generations. However, it was this early insight into maintaining their early plantings – even through the wine glut years when the government encouraged wineries to pull up their vines – that has allowed the now fifth and sixth generations of the Schrapel family to continue working this prized Barossan plot to produce luscious old vine wines alongside their new and alternate varieties. Visit Bethany Wines’ cellar door to enjoy a fresh and delicious picnic platter, taste estate made wines, take in the views, or even take a historic walk.

378 Bethany Rd, Tanunda
From Adelaide, travelling North away from the city on the Sturt Highway, take the Gomersal Road to Tanunda and then Bethany Road to the foothills.

Open Monday to Saturday 10am-5pm | Sundays 1pm-5pm

Visit the Bethany Hills website

Elderton Wines

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Neil and Lorraine Ashmead moved to the Barossa in 1979 after Lorraine’s father told them about a home with great potential. The homestead in the heart of the township of Nuriootpa was surrounded by extremely old Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon vines, which offered great appeal, but their move to the region was at a time when demand for Australian table wine was negligible, and the vineyard had become derelict since the vine pull to address the wine glut in the region. So, after years of no interest, the real estate agent eventually offered the Ashmeads the 72acre vineyard as a bonus, as part of the sale of the homestead. Three years later, after restoring the vineyard, Elderton Wines was born. Visit this quintessentially Barossan cellar door, complete with stunning views, fantastic wines and friendly staff.

3-5 Tanunda Rd, Nuriootpa

Open Monday to Friday 10am-4pm | weekends 11am-4pm

Visit the Elderton Wines website

Z Wine

Thorne Clarke cellar door

Z WINE is seriously dedicated to making some of the Barossa Valley’s best wine. The Z in the name stands for Zerk, a pioneering settler family who came to the Barossa in 1846. Today, Janelle and Kristen Zerk, the famed Barossa Valley sister duo, are the passionate owners of Z Wine who are dedicated to creating regional, small batch wines using grapes from 10 different vignerons in the Barossa area, honouring their connection to the region which began five generations ago. Z Wines proudly stand alongside many well-known wines – recently winning third to Penfold’s Grange in the 2018 WINESTATE International Shiraz Challenge and topping the Barossa Valley Grenache entries in the recent 2018 James Halliday national Grenache challenge. A visit to their cellar door will reward you with the chance to taste wines from four different Z Wine labels, including 17 highly-awarded wines. Their new cellar door and wine bar in the main street of Tanunda is very popular, offering regional produce and local live music to accompany the selection of distinct wines. 

SHOP 3, 109-111 Murray Street Tanunda
The corner of Basedow Road and Murray Street

Open Monday to Wednesday 10am-5pm | Thursday and Sunday 10am-8pm | Friday and Saturday 10am-late with LIVE music

Visit the Z Wine website

Pindarie Wines

Two hands boutique barossa winery

The old grain room and heritage stables make up the Pindarie cellar door that were hand restored over a period of 20 years by vigneron and winemaker couple Wendy Allan and Tony Brooks. A winner of multiple tourism awards, the cellar door is home to Pindarie’s Western Ridge estate grown wines, including Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon and unique range of Mediterranean varietals such as Montepulciano, Tempranillo, and Sangiovese with the cellar door also offering a genuine paddock to plate experience with their range of seasonal lunches featuring local produce. It’s the perfect place to relax, take in the views and enjoy regional flavours.

946 Rosedale Rd, Gomersal

Open Monday to Friday 11am-4pm | Weekends 11am-5pm

Visit the Pindarie Wines website

Henschke Wines

Iconic Yalumba in the Barossa

Visiting the historic Henschke cellar door, built in the 1860s by Johann Christian Henschke, is said to be one of the most captivating wine experiences in the Barossa. The intimate and charming space is a showcase and celebration of the Henschke family’s winemaking prowess and ability to continually produce internationally renowned wines. Drawing on select vineyards from the Eden, Adelaide Hills and Barossa Valley regions, the Henschke cellar door is the perfect place to sample the unique terroir expressed in their premium single-vineyard wines. VIP tours and private tastings are also available, or you can always book yourself a table at the famed Hill of Grace Restaurant.

1428 Keyneton Rd, Keyneton

Open Monday to Saturday 9am-4:30pm |Public holidays 10am-3pm | Closed Sundays, Good Friday, Christmas Day, New Year’s Day

Visit the Henschke website

Seppeltsfield

Grant Burge iconic barossa picnic cellar door

Seppeltsfield is one of Australia’s most historic wineries with a history forged by the pioneering vision of Joseph and Joanna Seppelt in 1851. Seppeltfield’s grand complex of heritage buildings is the perfect place to sample their unique 100-year-old fortified wines and to taste wine from the year of your birth. Seppelt is also credited with paving the way for progressive cool climate styles, particularly for producing Australia’s first Sparkling wine, as well as pioneering Sparkling Shiraz. The winery has enjoyed many accolades over their extensive history, including being recognised as Australia's most awarded Sparkling producer, as well as winning the highly sought-after Jimmy Watson Trophy, three times. Stop by for free wine tastings, or book a private tour to take in the winery’s full historic charm.

730 Seppeltsfield Rd, Barossa Valley

Open daily 10am-5pm

Visit the Seppeltsfield website

Thorn-Clarke

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The name Thorn-Clarke honours the coming together of two Barossa Valley wine and agricultural families, the Thorns and the Clarkes; the Thorns with six generations of Barossan winemaking in their blood and the Clarkes providing vigneron and geology expertise. While a relatively young winery in terms of some of their Barossa neighbours, Thorn-Clarke was established in 2001 and has gone from strength to strength since then. Today, they boast one of the largest private vineyard holdings in the Barossa, which provides the basis for exceptional Barossa and Eden Valley wines. Their relaxed Barossa cellar door is the perfect place to unwind during your visit to the region – sample local produce platters as you sit in their winery garden, or sample their Eden Valley whites and Barossa Valley reds, sourced from their four estate-owned vineyards.

226 Gawler Park Rd, Angaston

Open Monday to Friday 9am-5pm and 11am-4pm on weekends

Visit the Thorn-Clarke website

Two Hands Wines

The idea for Two Hands came about when founders, Michael Twelftree and Richard Mintz, decided to make the best possible Shiraz-based wines from prized growing regions throughout Australia. They had a drive to shake up the Shiraz styles of the time and instead focus on the unique regional and vineyard characteristics that can be expressed in a good Australian Shiraz. They soon built their state-of-the-art winery, crafted their first wines, and then the accolades began to reward them for their passion and dedication to Australian wine. Stop by for a structured yet relaxed tasting that takes guests through their range of innovative wines in an intimate and informative setting out on the tasting deck with views across Marananga.

273 Neldner Rd, Marananga

Open daily 10am-5pm

Visit the Two Hands website

Yalumba

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Established in 1849, Yalumba is one of Australia’s most iconic and important wine labels. The impressive wine room, built inside the original brandy store is the perfect place to sample the wide range of wines on offer from everyday table drops through to their exquisite reserve collections. A visit to their historic grounds and cellar door during the week may reward you with seeing the cooperage in action while you experience the fragrant sweet spice of their handmade barrels. And for weekend guests, the landscaped grounds, which are exquisitely framed by the Wine Room and the historic clock tower, are perfect for a relaxing walk or to throw down a picnic rug to enjoy one of Yalumba’s renowened Coopers Boards in the sun.

40 Eden Valley Rd, Angaston

Open daily 10am-5pm

Visit the Yalumba website

Grant Burge

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Nestled atop of a hill along Krondorf Road, the Grant Burge cellar door in the heart of the Barossa Valley enjoys exquisite views over the valley floor in one direction and rolling lawns and manicured gardens in the other. The tasting team at the cellar door will lead you through Grant Burge’s extensive range of wines, including refreshing Sparklings, crisp Rieslings to full-flavoured Chardonnay. And in keeping with Grant Burge’s great reputation for bold Barossan red, guests can also enjoy Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and of course, powerful Shiraz. Take in the views, savour a bottle of your favourite wine, and enjoy a meal at their cafe featuring local produce. Group tastings are available by appointment. 

Krondorf Rd, Tanunda

Open daily 10am-5pm

Visit the Grant Burge website

More information

For more information on visiting the Barossa be sure to visit the official Barossa website or stop by the Visitors Center in Tanunda when you're in the area. But, if you’d like to sample some of the wineries listed in this guide before you visit – explore our wide selection of Barossa wines and find out more about the wineries listed in this guide in our Meet the Makers section.

With our Wine Selectors Regional Releases, you'll experience a different wine region each release with all wines expertly selected by our Tasting Panel , plus you’ll receive comprehensive tasting notes and fascinating insights into each region. Visit our Regional Releases page to find out more!

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Mudgee - nest in the hills
Words by Keren Lavelle on 12 Sep 2016
There’s a zest for life, a sense of passion and purpose, among the winemakers, restaurateurs and providores of this Central Western NSW region. Friday night, with the sun setting and the moon rising, is a fine time to arrive at Lowe Wines, high on a hill-rise, with its vista of vines and cerulean blue hills beyond. There’s time enough for a quick catch-up with the very busy winemaker David Lowe, just before hundreds of guests are seated at tables in his winery for dinner and a show. Lowe is a sixth-generation descendant of the first Lowes to take up farming on this property, and he’s a passionate convert to organic, indeed biodynamic, farming measures. "When I took over, the soils here were completely degraded, needing drastic repair, and biodynamics seemed the fastest and best way to fix them,” Lowe says. Biodynamic farming techniques involve burying cow horns with a mixture of fermented manure, minerals and herbs at specific phases in the lunar cycle ‘to harmonise the vital life forces of the farm’, as one authority explains it. While it’s based on belief more than theory, it’s certainly working here. David is famous for his premium, certified organic wines; some made without any preservatives, notably a Shiraz , demand for which is high. Adjacent to the winery is The Zin House, Mudgee’s only restaurant with a SMH Good Food Guide chef’s hat. Chef Kim Curry is David Lowe’s partner, so naturally, flights of Lowe Wines accompany her degustation menus, which are inspired by what’s fresh and in season – 60 to 70 per cent of the ingredients are sourced locally, many of them grown here on the farm. PALPABLE PASSION There is a long tradition of organic winemaking in Mudgee , starting with Australia’s first organic vineyard, Botobolar in 1971. At Vinifera Wines, the McKendry family is celebrating having achieved organic certification for their wines. After Tony and Debbie McKendry recognised climatic similarities between Mudgee and Spain’s Rioja region, they embarked on Spanish varieties like Tempranillo, Graciano and Gran Tinto – all of which have been very popular – however, it’s their Chardonnay that leaves me smitten. The passion emanating from the winemakers – indeed, from all the Mudgee producers – is palpable. They care deeply about quality, and are continually improvising and experimenting to improve quality and variety. The other striking feature is how collaborative they are – they share advice and ideas, and as winemaker Peter Logan tells me, they have fun together – the winemakers field their own indoor soccer team in a local comp. A STUNNING OUTLOOK With over 40 cellar doors in the fairly compact Mudgee wine region, there’s a lot of choice. There’s also plenty to please the eye, like the stunning tasting room and deck at Logan Wines with its sweeping view of Apple Tree Flat and its surrounding pyramidal hills. Peter Logan, celebrating his 20th vintage, is happy to show off his latest range called Ridge of Tears, two very different styles of Shiraz. Each is made from low-yield fruit and treated much the same, but ‘terroir’ is the variable – one comes from Logan’s Orange basalt-based vineyard, the other from Mudgee’s more loamy soils. The terrace at Moothi Estate has another gorgeous view, especially at sunset. ‘Moothi’ is another version of ‘Mudgee’, meaning ‘nest in the hills’ in the Wiradjuri language, extremely apt for this beautiful place. Jessica and Jason Chrcek now run Moothi Estate vineyard, which her parents started. At their cellar door, they serve award-winning platters of cheese, pickles and smallgoods – the lamb pastrami is a great discovery. At another family enterprise, the Robert Stein Vineyard and Winery, the multitalented, third-generation winemaker Jacob Stein (playing striker in the winemakers’ soccer team), also has responsibility for looking after the ‘old world’ varieties of pig that graze on the property. His brother-in-law, chef Andy Crestani, roasts the resulting free-range pork at the winery’s restaurant Pipeclay Pumphouse, and it appears as one of the dishes in the dinner degustation. (I’m keen to come back for breakfast to try the bacon and egg gnocchi with truffle oil.) Just about every cellar door will serve you High Valley Wine & Cheese Factory’s handmade soft cheeses, and they return the complement by serving local wines in their tasting room. The couple behind High Valley, Ro and Grovenor Francis, are no slouches. They already had 40 years of farming experience, and 20 years of viticulture behind them before venturing into dairy manufacture. The walls of their tasting room are plastered with the awards their wines and cheeses have won. ALL AGES ADVENTURES I discover local passion isn’t confined to producers when I meet ‘mine host’ of Mudgee’s Getaway Cottages, Elizabeth Etherington, a former mayor of Mudgee. These six holiday dwellings appear to be houses on an ordinary street a few minutes’ walk from the centre of town, but you soon discover that they all back onto a 3.64-hectare farm-stay wonderland on the banks of the Cudgegong River. “I’m a baby boomer,” Etherington explains, “and I grew up with plenty of space to play and roam, and with innocent freedom to explore. When I created Getaway Cottages, I had in mind to provide for today’s children the joy of nature, which many seem to miss out on.” To this end, Elizabeth Etherington has created a kids’ paradise, complete with an ostrich, a donkey, rabbits, flourishing vegetable gardens to raid for dinner, and plenty of toys and activities, including, for the big kids, a chip’n’putt golf course. In conversation, it transpires that Etherington is a producer as well, of the Orchy brand of fruit juices, which is a “100% Australian family-owned business since 1876.” Mudgee’s food manufacturing history goes way back. In town, Roth’s Wine Bar, holding the oldest wine bar licence in NSW, is the place to try (and buy) almost all of the district’s wines (due to the peculiarities of the ancient licence, you are also permitted to take away). Here you can dig into pizza, listen to live music, and try Roth’s special in-house drinks, such as the ‘1080’ (named after a poison bait) and ‘Diesel’. Before being licensed in 1923, when Roth’s was a general store, these were code names for the sly grog chalked up on farmers’ accounts. Also possessing a fine cellar, the recently renovated Oriental Hotel offers an elevated dining/drinking experience (and city views) on its second-storey deck, while at the nearby Wineglass Bar and Grill, owner and chef Scott Tracey serves breakfast, lunch and dinner (and provides chic boutique accommodation) in a restored 1850s former hostelry for mail coaches. BEER AND BITES It’s not all about the wine (and food), however, there are very fine craft beers to be sampled at the Mudgee Brewing Company (another live music venue), housed in a historic wool store; and adjacent to Vinifera Wines there’s Baker Williams Distillery, where distillers Nathan Williams and Helen Baker are having a lot of fun coming up with proof concoctions – butterscotch schnapps, anyone? Good coffee can also be found – at the Wineglass, you can buy the four-shot ‘bucket’, ideal for coping with a bad hangover. One of the most popular breakfast spots in town is the leafy courtyard café at Albie + Esthers, which transforms into a wine bar at night (of course). Tea is not neglected either – exotic varieties (and fresh handmade dumplings) feature on the menu of the delightful 29 nine 99 Yum Cha and Tea House at nearby Rylestone; it’s well worth stopping here for refreshments if you are making the 3.5 to 4 hour drive from Sydney. There’s lots more to explore – the old gold-mining township of Gulgong, the racehorses of Goree Park, the fine streets and shops of Mudgee itself, and more wineries – but when you eventually have to leave, FlyPelican can make light work of the trip with a 50 minute flight to Sydney. (Speaking of ‘light’, and speaking from experience, the aircraft’s 23kg luggage limit means it may be best to freight your wine purchases beforehand.) It’s good to know, however, that whenever you pine for a taste of more Mudgee magic, it can be quick and easy to return.
Wine
The Granite Belt: Beautiful One Day, Perfect Wine The Next
Words by Paul Diamond on 8 May 2017
Cool climate wines from Queensland – if that sounds strange, head to the  Granite Belt wine region  and you’ll find plenty! It’s well established that the first ‘official’ Australian wine region was Farm Cove NSW, planted by Captain Arthur Phillip in 1788. But what about the second? If you assumed it was in South Australia, Victoria or even Tasmania, you would be wrong.  It is, in fact, Queensland’s Granite Belt, planted in 1820, preceding Victorian and South Australian regions by 15-plus years. Given most of Queensland is hot and tropical, we usually associate it with beaches and reefs rather than grape vines. However, the Sunshine State has a rich and varied agricultural history and people are now starting to favour the Granite Belt’s cool climate, Euro-style wines. Three hours south west of Brisbane on the southern Darling Downs, the Granite Belt is situated around Queensland’s apple capital, Stanthorpe. This is heralded on your arrival by a massive apple on a pole, a bold indicator of local pride in the tradition of Coffs Harbour’s big banana, Ballina’s prawn and Goulburn’s Merino. Originally known as ‘Quart Pot Creek’, Stanthorpe was settled when tin was discovered in the late 1800s. Fruit production followed as the altitude and climate started to attract Italian immigrants who’d come to Australia to cut cane and then moved south to take up pastoral leases.  Cool Climb Wines As you travel south west from Ipswich along the Cunningham Highway, you start the gradual climb through the Great Dividing Range. By the town of Aratula, a popular resting spot, the temperature drops considerably and you realise how cool it gets at 110 metres above sea level.  The Granite Belt has some of Australia’s highest altitude vineyards and it is the associated cool climate that is the perfect setting for the region’s fine boned wines. So don’t visit this region expecting big, ripe wine styles that are popular in warmer areas. The cool climate dictates that the Granite Belt’s wine styles are closer to those of Europe. Think medium bodied, savoury reds with fine tannins and pronounced acidity. In the whites, expect lighter, citrus driven styles with elegant layers and fine acid lines. Adding to the Granite Belt’s wine identity is the fact it excels in alternative styles. While you’ll certainly find mainstream varieties like  Shiraz ,  Cabernet   and  Chardonnay , real excitement comes from discoveries like  Fiano ,  Vermentino , Chenin Blanc, Savagnin, Barbera, Graciano, Durif, Nebbiolo and Tannat. Granite Belt producers have long recognised that these varieties are the future and with their unique alternative identity, have dubbed themselves the ‘Strange Birds’ of the Australian wine scene. In fact, visitors can explore this fascinating region by following one of the Strange Bird Wine Trails. BOIREANN WINERY Established in the early 1980s by Peter and Therese Stark, Boireann has been a Granite Belt standout for decades. While quality and consistency are high, production is low, with reds the specialty and only a very small amount of  Viognier  grown to co-ferment with Shiraz. Standouts are their Shiraz Viognier, Barbera, Nebbiolo and the ‘Rosso’, a Nebbiolo Barbera blend. www.boireannwinery.com.au/ GOLDEN GROVE Third generation winemaker Ray Costanzo has made wine all over the world, but is passionate about the Granite Belt. Golden Grove is one of the oldest wineries in the region, making a wide range of wines including Sparkling Vermentino, Barbera, Nero d’Avola and  Tempranillo , but it is Ray’s  Vermentino  that has developed a solid following.  www.goldengroveestate.com.au JESTER HILL Established in 1993, Jester Hill is now a family affair, having been bought by ex-health professionals Michael and Ann Burke in 2010. With the new focus that Michael is bringing to the wines, the estate is building momentum and picking up accolades along the way. Standouts include their Roussanne, Chardonnay, Shiraz and  Petit Verdot .  www.jesterhillwines.com.au/ BALLANDEAN With an extraordinary history of winemaking that stretches back to the 1930s, the Puglisi family have been operating their cellar door and passionately flying the Granite Belt flag since 1970. Fourth generation Puglisis Leeane and Robyn are warm, generous, regional advocates, who have a large cellar door from which they love sharing their passion for both the wines and the people of the Granite Belt. Tasting highlights include their  Viognier , Opera Block Shiraz and Saperavi, a full-bodied red that originally hails from Georgia.   www.ballandeanestate.com/ JUST RED Another family-owned winery, Just Red is run by Tony and Julie Hassall with their son Michael and daughter Nikki. Just Red’s organic wines are styled on the great wines of the Rhône and are winning awards in the show system. Their star wines include Tannat, Shiraz Viognier, Cabernet Merlot. www.justred.com.au/ RIDGEMILL ESTATE WINERY Starting its life as Emerald Hill in 1998, Ridgemill boasts a modern but unpretentious cellar door looking out on dramatic mountain surroundings. The broad range of wines is crafted by winemaker Peter McGlashan and includes Chardonnay, Shiraz, Shiraz Viognier, Mourvèdre and Saparavi. With its self-contained studio cabins, Ridgemill is a great place to base yourself. www.ridgemillestate.com/ SYMPHONY HILL Symphony Hill’s winemaker Mike Hayes is quite possibly the Australian king of alternative wine varieties. Mike won the Churchill Fellowship and travelled around the world studying alternative styles. His wines are highly awarded, vibrant and interesting. A trip to the Granite Belt is not complete without a tasting with Mike, including his standout expressions of  Fiano , Lagrien, Gewürztraminer,  Petit Verdot  and Reserve Shiraz. www.symphonyhill.com.au/ TOBIN WINE Adrian Tobin’s wines are a strong philosophical statement, reinforcing the notion that wine is made in the vineyard.  Since establishing Tobin Wine in 1999, Adrian has been deeply connected to his vines and produces a small amount of high quality Sauv Blanc, Semillon, Chardonnay, Merlot, Shiraz and Cabernet. All of Adrian’s wines are named after his grandchildren and are collectables.  www.tobinwines.com.au/ GIRRAWEEN ESTATE Steve Messiter and his wife Lisa started Girraween Estate in 2009. Small and picturesque, it is home to one of the region’s earliest vine plantings. They produce modest amounts of Sparkling wines, including Pinot Chardonnay along with Shiraz, Rosé and Sauv Blanc. Their table wines include Sauv Blanc, Chardonnay, Shiraz and Cabernet.  www.girraweenestate.com.au FEELING HUNGRY There is no shortage of good food in the Granite Belt, but a trip to  Sutton’s Farm  is essential. An apple orchard, it’s owned by David and Roslyn Sutton, who specialise in all things apple, including juice, cider and brandy. Their shed café also pays homage to the humble apple with the signature dish being home made apple pie served with Sutton’s spiced apple cider ice cream and whipped cream. For breakfast, try  Zest Café  located in town, where the coffee is fantastic and their baking game is strong. Their breakfast will definitely see you going back for seconds.  A delicious choice for lunch or dinner is the  Barrelroom and Larder , lovingly run by Travis Crane and Arabella Chambers.  Attached to Ballandean winery, the Barrelroom is casual in style and fine in output. Everything that Travis and Arabella cook comes from within a three hour radius and if it doesn’t exist in that area, they don’t cook it. A fantastic way to spend an afternoon is with Ben and Louise Lanyon at their  McGregor Terrace Food Project . Based in a Stanthorpe, this neighborhood bistro with a gorgeous whimsical garden offers cooking from the heart with the surrounds to match. Whether your choice is a Granite Belt alternative ‘Strange Bird’ or a more traditional varietal, take it along to Ben and Lou’s Food Project, sit out the back and you’ll feel like you’re in the south of France. You will, in fact, be in Queensland, thinking that it is a pretty cool place to be; literally and figuratively.     
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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